The new with the old

Cell phones and traditional dress
Cell phones and traditional dress

In a world where change exists at a blistering pace, the pace may be at light speed in Papua New Guinea. Technology usage is exploding as the country rushes to embrace mobile phone technology. Did you know that the language development and Bible translation effort in PNG is putting portions of Scriptures on the internet and SD cards, both accessible by mobile phones? This enables people in some of the remotest parts of PNG to have access to Scriptures in the language they know the best – the one they learned at birth, their heart language.

Who makes this happen?

Thanks to you!
Thanks to you!

The language development and Bible translation effort in Papua New Guinea would screech to a halt if it was up to one person. It takes a team. Some go, some stay, some give, some encourage and most importantly, some pray. Will you  pray today that the team would continue to grow?

Where there is rain…

Raindrops
Raindrops

You are probably familiar with the  saying…. Without rain, there couldn’t be a rainbow. Well, sometimes the things we encounter are not so bright and sunny. They come with a little bit of rain (or a lot of rain like during the rainy season in Papua New Guinea.)  But without the difficulties and stresses of life, we would miss the blessings that we experience when they are overcome.  Bible translation and language development are long-term projects. Workers in these projects need to persevere through the storms and keep an eye out for  the rainbows. Pray for endurance for the language development and Bible translation workers in PNG.

Look for the rainbow
Look for the rainbow

A strong foundation

Laying the foundation - Karen Weaver
Laying the foundation – Karen Weaver

Carrying a passage of Scripture written in her own heart language, Abu Daniels approached the rectangular foundation of the building being constructed at the Ukarumpa Training Center. She joined other teachers, students and community members in dedicating the new structure to God.

Principal Max Sahl explained that the building would have a classroom at one end, administrative offices at the other, and a conference room with book storage and a library in the middle. Although Mr. Sahl is happy that the center hosted 43 workshops and courses last year, and is on target for the same this year, he encouraged people, “Remember: this is the Lord’s doing and not our own. We don’t ever what to think we are the ones doing this work.”

Dr. Neil Coulter, Director for Language Services, shared from I Corinthians 3:10 about building a foundation. He emphasized that in erecting this physical building, the important thing is that it be used of God to build a spiritual foundation in people’s lives. He explained, “It is our hope that when students leave here they will be stronger in their faith and understand more clearly their relationship with God.”

As the sun rose over the mountains, men and women stepped forward one by one to lay their heart-language scripture in the foundation. Later the construction team would pour cement over the verses, making them a permanent part of the building. In doing this, they demonstrated that they were building on the firm foundation of the Word of God, for the purpose of training people to translate that Word into the mother tongue languages of Papua New Guinea.

Mrs. Daniels, an elementary school teacher, speaks the Yom Kawac dialect of the Bukawa language. Remembering her children at home, she said, “My language area is in the heart of Lae City, but they go to schools that teach in the vernacular. I want my children to grow up knowing their language.” Reflecting the feelings of most people present that morning, she concluded, “This was a very meaningful event. I am glad my language is written in the foundation of this building.”

Ukarumpa Training Centre
Ukarumpa Training Centre

Never standing still

Always in motion
Always in motion

The language development and Bible translation movement in Papua New Guinea faces many challenges or should we say opportunities. With almost 300 of the over 830 languages needing a project started, it is easy to pursue these opportunities, full-time.  But this full-time pace is not sustainable. Language workers need to take breaks and to find time to focus on family, health and spiritual needs. That is not easy for some. Pray that rest would come to those that need it, perhaps even today.

What do the words say?

My language - my words
My language – my words

Not everyone can read the words in the translated Scriptures. While literacy workers encourage students of all ages to learn how to read, some may never learn. That is where the oral Scripture strategies become important. AudiBibles, recorded Scriptures on miniature solar-powered players, bring the Scriptures to those who cannot read. Pray that more Scriptures would be made available in an oral format in Papua New Guinea.

How do you say this word?

Reading my language
Reading my language

It’s not all about translating. Literacy workers are vital to the language development and Bible Translation effort. Pray that literacy workers would be able to teach Papua New Guinean  children and adults how to read the Scriptures in their tokples – their heart language.