Ripe bananas

There's my sweetheart!
There’s my sweetheart!

Do you call your spouse by a term of endearment- perhaps “Honey” or “Sweetheart” or “Dear”?

Tommy and Konni Logan have lived among the Kasua people for more than 20 years, working alongside a team of Kasua men to translate God’s Word into their language. Over the years they have learned that the way something is expressed in Kasua may be completely different from the way the same concept is expressed in English. For example, while Konni might call her husband “Sweetheart,” the wives of the other workers would use a different term of endearment.

Papua New Guinea’s delicious bananas are ripened and sweetened in rich volcanic soil beneath the warm equatorial sun. It’s no wonder that some Kasua wives say to their husbands, “ne tolo kene,” which means, “my ripe banana.”
In PNG, bananas are both sweet and plentiful. In fact, sixteen different varieties grow in the area where the Kasua people live in the Western Province. One variety is called supupanami and it is similar to the kind sold in grocery stores in North America. One stalk alone weighs about 30 pounds. They are nutritious, available year-round, and easy to harvest.

When bananas start to ripen, the entire stalk turns quickly from green to yellow. Since a harvest of five or six dozen bananas is more than one family can eat in a day or two, it’s a good opportunity to practice a common PNG custom: sharing food with the neighbors.
Tommy and Konni enjoy passing out their ripe bananas to friends in their village. They also enjoy sharing eternal food with them: the Word of God. The Kasua New Testament is 100% drafted, and 80% of it has been reviewed with a consultant. When the final 20% is consultant checked, the book will be ready for printing!

The Logans look forward to the day when the Kasua people will be able to read the entire New Testament in their language. They trust the people will find God’s words to be as sweet as a ripe banana.

Bananas for sale!
Bananas for sale!
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